Fashion Saves the Birds

jeanofalltrades

You might sometimes think that fashion has gone to the birds, but in the 1920s, it actually saved a few species.

You see, in the late 1800s, large, ornate hats were all the rage. Adorned with lace and pearls and feathers, some even had entire bird nests or cages incorporated into them! And a Victorian lady never left the house without a hat.

Hunters descended on the Florida Everglades in search of spoonbills, flamingos, herons, and egrets. These birds were favored for their plumes so they were killed by the millions. Conservationists tried to stop the massacre (around this time a few of them formed the National Audubon Society), but still the demand grew.

Eventually, feathers were worth more than double their weight in gold! That meant it was more lucrative (and easier) to kill birds than to pan for gold. In a time when a month’s rent was $10, the plumes of…

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About carmen

Beauty is only skin deep, but health goes deep to the bones. Money can buy designer clothes, but it can’t buy health. https://fashionableover50.wordpress.com/
This entry was posted in Animals, Fashion, Florida, Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Fashion Saves the Birds

  1. Barb says:

    I looooove hats. I added a couple of feathers to one of mine to update it and was shocked at how expensive feathers are. Guess, I’ll look for ol’ turkey feathers next time. Interesting post.

    Like

  2. Bob Eberhardt says:

    see comment on Jean’s blog

    Like

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